Bovine Cartilage – the Good and the Bad

Posted: November 20, 2014 in Alternative Therapy
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The first published clinical results of the effectiveness of bovine cartilage in the treatment of cancer appeared in 1985, after a successful five-year trial under FDA permit on 31 terminal patients who had been given the full possible spectrum of orthodox treatments and had failed to respond. The results were encouraging. “Of the 31 patients cited, 90 percent showed a partial or complete response. Eleven (35 percent) showed complete response with probable or possible cures, eight patients (26 per cent) had a complete response but sustained a relapse; six sustained a partial response. Of the 35 percent who showed complete response, nine lived on without any cancer activity and died of non-cancer related diseases or old age.” Although all types of cartilage are a rich source of the active ingredients for healing, the cartilage type appears to influence the chances of recovery. Research has shown that although shark cartilage contained 1000 times more of the active ingredients, their release from shark cartilage took 41 days in vitro. It would appear that this difficulty is the reason why such large amounts are necessary in the use of shark cartilage, whereas all the successful bovine results have been obtained using only 9 grams per day.” Having said all of that, the respected Minnesota Wellness folks question these studies: “This is much cheaper than Shark Cartilage and is being presently studied here in America with, ostensibly, very good results. However, the studies have been fudged, the success rate of 99% is highly inflated, and the people conducting these studies [I am not sure who he is talking about] seem to lack even quintessential ethics. Thus we cannot recommend bovine cartilage to anyone

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